Concerns over debris littering the world’s oceans are back in the spotlight after a Canadian fishing crew found a lobster with the blue and red Pepsi logo imprinted on its claw. The ‘tattooed’ lobster was found off New Brunswick, Canada. Photo: Karissa Lindstrand

By Ashifa Kassam
29 November 2017

TORONTO (The Guardian) – Concerns over debris littering the world’s oceans are back in the spotlight after a Canadian fishing crew found a lobster with the blue and red Pepsi logo imprinted on its claw.

Trapped in the waters off Grand Manan, New Brunswick, the lobster had been loaded on to a crate to have its claws banded when Karissa Lindstrand came across it.

Lindstrand, who drinks as many as 12 cans of Pepsi a day, quickly spotted the resemblance.

“I was like: ‘Oh, that’s a Pepsi can,’” she said. On closer look, it seemed more like a tattoo on the claw. “It looked like it was a print put right on the lobster claw.”

Neither she or any of the crew had seen anything like it. More than a week after the find, debate has swirled over how it might have come to be: some believe the lobster might have grown around a can that ended up at the bottom of the ocean. Others speculate that part of a Pepsi box somehow become stuck on the lobster. […]

To Lindstrand, the lobster with the Pepsi imprint hints at the magnitude of rubbish ending up in the ocean. “We don’t see it floating around us when we’re out there,” she said. “I do see stuff along the shorelines that gets washed up on the beaches or the sides of the cliffs.” [more]

Lobster found with Pepsi logo 'tattoo' fuels fears over ocean litter

1 comments :

  1. Anonymous said...

    Two points - anybody that drinks soda pop (any soda pop) is risking serious health defects. 12 cans a day is a death sentence.

    The ocean litter is enormous. 99.99% of this is entirely out of sight, out of mind. It's far, far worse then being reported. And it's continuing to worsen. Humanity has done almost nothing to stop the dumping of debris into the oceans. There is also no clean up taking place on the ocean floor.

    The "garbage patch" islands of debris continue to grow, as does beach debris tossed up by waves and storms. This is the real story - how enormous the problem has become.

    The lobster is going to be eaten (such is the fate of lobsters), but it's being plucked from a garbage dump.  

 

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