Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with heads of major foreign companies at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum in St. Petersburg, Russia, Friday, 2 June 2017. Photo: Sergei Savostyanov / TASS News Agency Pool / The Associated Press

By Michael Biesecker
2 June 2017

WASHINGTON (Associated Press) – While other world leaders have strongly condemned President Donald Trump's decision to abandon the Paris climate accord, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Friday he won't judge.

"Don't worry, be happy!" Putin quipped after being asked for his reaction at an economic forum in St. Petersburg, Russia. He said the climate deal doesn't formally go into effect until 2021, giving nations years to come up with a constructive solution to combating global warming.

For Putin, leader of the world's biggest crude oil producer and fifth-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, there was plenty to cheer in Trump's rejection of the agreement painstakingly negotiated by the Obama administration and signed by 195 countries.

Trump's move drives another wedge between the United States and its traditional European allies, while aligning its stance closer to Russia in boosting fossil fuels while deferring action to curb climate change.

While Putin's government signed the 2015 Paris accord, he has delayed formally ratifying the agreement for at least two more years. Russia's voluntary reduction goals under the deal are among the weakest submitted by any country, potentially allowing it to spew more planet-warming emissions in future years, not less. [more]

Putin: 'Don't worry, be happy' as Trump ditches climate deal

2 comments :

  1. Anonymous said...

    Is there a long term temperature chart in available? Not temperature anomaly, not CO2, just temperature. It would be helpful to have a long term chart, that shows the temperature rise over the long term. Much like you can convince people the stock market rises over time, that would help show people what's happened with temperatures. I can't seem to find one.  

  2. Anonymous said...

    This Wiki page for instance is helpful. The record lows and highs by year, about halfway down the page. Charts like this are helpful for the average person. This chart shows there hasn't been a record low broken since 1993. The majority of record lows were prior to 1920. Perhaps it might be a better idea, to show people just how much the average lows have risen?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_of_Moscow

     

 

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