A sign on a the front of a building warns residents to filter their water in Flint, Michigan, where a federal emergency was declared after lead contaminated drinking water. Photo: Bill Pugliano / Getty Images

By Peter Neill
1 February 2016

(NY Daily News) – The World Economic Forum, which just completed its 2016 meeting in Davos, Switzerland, last year recognized the world water crisis as the most impactful global risk.

The situation is no less complicated or critical today, with California reevaluating its water policies and structures as a result of pervasive drought; with the mega-city São Paulo, Brazil, reacting to a failed municipal water system serving millions; with Flint, Mich., confronting the health consequences of a switch to its polluted river as its drinking water source; with communities in the U.S. and Europe rising up to oppose the water pollution and other destructive outcomes of hydro-fracturing; with global warming, continuing drought, polar melt, sea level rise, extreme weather, and other climate impacts affecting the stability of artisanal and industrial farmers; and with the inter-connected and ever-increasing demand for an ever-decreasing water supply worldwide dislocating communities, driving a new and disparate migrations, and creating conflict in many unexpected places between water-haves and water-have-nots.

The World Economic Forum, which just completed its 2016 meeting in Davos, Switzerland, last year recognized the world water crisis as the most impactful global risk.

The situation is no less complicated or critical today, with California reevaluating its water policies and structures as a result of pervasive drought; with the mega-city São Paulo, Brazil, reacting to a failed municipal water system serving millions; with Flint, Michigan, confronting the health consequences of a switch to its polluted river as its drinking water source; with communities in the U.S. and Europe rising up to oppose the water pollution and other destructive outcomes of hydro-fracturing; with global warming, continuing drought, polar melt, sea level rise, extreme weather, and other climate impacts affecting the stability of artisanal and industrial farmers; and with the inter-connected and ever-increasing demand for an ever-decreasing water supply worldwide dislocating communities, driving a new and disparate migrations, and creating conflict in many unexpected places between water-haves and water-have-nots.

A traditional response has been expressed in Africa, for example, where water shortages have long characterized the plight of remote villagers reliant on wells — local or sometimes a long walk away — inadequate to either the needs of garden irrigation, herd animals, or the personal needs for drinking water and hygiene. […]

A traditional response has been expressed in Africa, for example, where water shortages have long characterized the plight of remote villagers reliant on wells — local or sometimes a long walk away — inadequate to either the needs of garden irrigation, herd animals, or the personal needs for drinking water and hygiene. [more]

Drowning in danger: Worldwide water crisis deemed biggest global risk

1 comments :

  1. messtime said...

    Here in New Zealand i have noticed several cases of communities with bad water quality problems. I do not trust the water serving my area of Whangarei. So, i first boil a pot of water, then let it cool down (takes about 5 hours to cool), then i pour cooled water through a Brita pitcher.
    Governments don't seem too interested in maintaining a high degree of water quality.  

 

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