Mother Mbeli takes care of her newly born Western Lowland Gorilla baby boy in an enclosure at Sydney's Taronga Zoo on 31 October 2014. Scientists say Ebola has joined poaching and deforestation as a 'major threat to African apes'. It is estimated that one-third of the world's gorillas and chimpanzees have been lost to the virus. Photo: AFP / Getty Images

By Allison Jackson
22 January 2015

(Global Post) – The human tragedy caused by the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has been well documented. […]

But humans are not the only victims of this horrible disease, which is spread through contact with the blood, sweat and other bodily fluids of an infected person.

Since the 1990s, Ebola has devastated the great ape population in Africa. It is estimated that one-third of the world’s gorillas and chimpanzees have been lost to the virus, which was discovered in 1976.

The WWF estimates there are around 100,000 gorillas left in the wild, while there are between 150,000 and 250,000 chimpanzees.

Scientists say Ebola has now joined poaching and deforestation as a “major threat to African apes” and it has been confirmed as one of the “important sources of mortality in wild gorillas and chimpanzees.” […]

“While the Ebola virus alone does not threaten apes and chimpanzees with extinction, this epidemic has reduced the population to a point where it can no longer sustain itself in the face of poaching and other pressures,” according to a report on AnimalResearch.Info. [more]

Ebola has now killed a third of the world’s gorilla and chimpanzee populations

1 comments :

  1. Anonymous said...

    I'm pretty green. I mean, I follow the "if it's pee leave it be, and if it's brown flush it down" rule.  

 

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