Mutated tomato (left) from Mata-Hyun, near the Fukushima nuclear plant, compared with normal tomato (right). Photo: blog.donga.com

Mutated tomato (left) from Mata-Hyun, compared with normal tomato (right).

15 July 2013 (MSN) – It might be wise to steer clear of vegetables from Japan's Fukushima area for, oh, say a few hundred years. A Korean website assembled this image collection of produce from towns and villages surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Mutated tangerine from the southern area of Kyushu, near the Fukushima nuclear plant. Photo: blog.donga.com

Mutated tangerine from the southern area of Kyushu.

And they are NOT pretty pictures. From Siamese-twinned corn cobs to what can only be called peaches with elephantiasis, the region's agriculture appears to have taken a heavy radiation hit from the nuclear disaster in 2011. It's not clear yet what effect eating the produce might have on the population, but you never know. It could be pretty dangerous, but you never know — in an ideal world, maybe it could give you superpowers. [Source] [Source]

Mutated daisy from Sakai city Mikuni-Cho, Sakai-Ku, near the Fukushima nuclear plant. Photo: blog.donga.com

Mutated daisy from Sakai city Mikuni-Cho, Sakai-Ku.

 

Mutated tree frog (above) from Aki-gun, Kochi Prefecture, near the Fukushima nuclear plant, compared with normal frog (below). Photo: blog.donga.com

Mutated tree frog (above) from Aki-gun, Kochi Prefecture, compared with normal frog (below). [more]

2 years after nuclear disaster, Japan spawns freaky fruits and veggies

1 comments:

  1. Jim said...

    I accidentally deleted a comment by Anonymous, so here it is again:

    "The place names mentioned here either can't be found on Google Maps or are many many miles away from Fukushima such as Kochi prefecture. Some of these mutations occur quite naturally and it looks like it's been randomly linked to the Fukushima disaster."  

 

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