Michie Niikawa struggles to define her role as school principal. Two years since taking over at Ukedo Elementary School in the town of Namie, abandoned after the Fukushima nuclear meltdowns, the 54 year-old has yet to welcome her first class of students, greet teachers, or visit classrooms. Photo: Akiko Fujita / ABC News

By AKIKO FUJITA
10 March 2013

NAMIE, Japan (ABC News) – Michie Niikawa struggles to define her role as school principal.

Two years since taking over at Ukedo Elementary School in the town of Namie, the 54-year-old has yet to welcome her first class of students, greet teachers, or visit classrooms.

Most days, she works in a cramped corner on the second floor of a prefabricated structure that houses city hall, 50 miles from the town.

"[The school] exists in name alone," Niikawa, a 34-year veteran teacher says. "I have struggled to find ways to best serve my students."

The school's structure still stands along Namie's waterfront, inside the government mandated nuclear exclusion zone.

The roof provides a clear view of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant, where nearly 3,000 people still work daily.

But in areas around the school, there are no signs of life. Smashed cars and rusted boats washed up from the tsunami dot the bleak landscape that surrounds Ukedo.

The school itself is a skeleton of the structure Niikawa remembers. Windows are smashed, classrooms cleared out. A graduation sign from March 11, the day the tsunami hit, still hangs above badly cracked floors in the school gym.

Like so many towns inside the 12-mile no-go zone, Namie was struck by a tragic trifecta: earthquake, tsunami, and radiation leak.

Ukedo Elementary's 92 students evacuated thinking they would return once the massive waves receded. But two years on, radiation fallout from the nuclear disaster has left them in perpetual limbo.

Town officials say exposure levels have dropped 40 percent in two years, but in some hot spots they are still four times the legal limit for nuclear workers in the United States.

Niikawa, who began her tenure as principal five months after the disasters struck, has been tasked with keeping the "spirit" of Ukedo alive, while the central and local governments come up with a plan to make the area livable again.

It is no simple task -- considering radiation fears have pushed many of her students out of the region, hours away. [more]

Fukushima School in Limbo, Two Years After Nuclear Disaster

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